Rolling the Dice: Can the Eagles Win A Super Bowl with Chip Kelly?

Chip Kelly is hoping his up-tempo spread offense can take the Eagles to a Super Bowl title.

Chip Kelly is hoping his up-tempo spread offense can take the Eagles to a Super Bowl title.

By Chris Murray

For the Philadelphia Sunday Sun and The Chris Murray Report

PHILADELPHIA—Perhaps the one question Eagles fans  have for Chip Kelly, the  Birds new head coach, is will his fast-paced, no-huddle, spread-option offense will be good enough to bring the franchise its first Super Bowl title?

Eagles’ owner Jeffrey Lurie is hoping that Kelly can turn the Birds fortune’s around as quickly as he did during his four seasons at Oregon.  While with the Ducks, Kelly compiled a 46-7 record, which included a trip to the 2010 BCS National Championship game. He also served as the team’s offensive coordinator before taking the head coaching job.

“Chip Kelly will be an outstanding head coach for the Eagles,” said Lurie in a statement released by the team. “He has a brilliant football mind. He motivates his team with his actions as well as his words. He will be a great leader for us and will bring a fresh energetic approach to our team.”

Kelly does have a tough act to follow after former Birds head coach Andy Reid, who finished his 14-year tenure as the winningest coach in Eagles history with nine playoff appearances, six division titles, five trips to the NFC title game and one conference title.

After interviewing with the Eagles for over nine hours in Arizona shortly after his team’s victory over Kansas State in the Fiesta Bowl two weeks ago, Kelly had originally opted to stay at Oregon. Why he apparently changed his mind is not known.

There is speculation that Oregon maybe facing NCAA sanctions because Kelly used a recruiting service. According to ESPN.com, Kelly said he wasn’t running away from anything and had been cooperating with the NCAA.

In four seasons at Oregon, Kelly’s up-tempo, spread offense averaged 44 points per game. Last season, the Ducks rolled up 49.6 points per game. The Oregon offense is run exclusively from the shotgun formation with the quarterback opting to run, pass or hand it off to a running back usually up the middle of a defense.

It is an offense that requires the quarterback to be mobile and would put him in situations where he would be hit by the defense.  Kelly’s challenge will be to make that offense work in a league where the defensive linemen and linebackers are as fast as some running backs. It’s not like the Eagles are going to be playing Washington State or Cal every week.

Several teams around the league use a version of the spread option offense including the Washington Redskins, the New England Patriots, the San Francisco 49ers, the Carolina Panthers and the Seattle Seahawks.

“It’s starting to form more toward that offense. Anytime you have dual threat quarterback, it puts pressure on the defense that they can do numerous things throwing or running the ball,” said San Francisco 49ers running back LaMichael James, who played for Kelly at Oregon.

Patriots head coach Bill Belichick said he’s even learned a thing or two from Kelly’s uptempo offense.

“I was interested to hear how he did it. I would say he expanded it to a different level and it was very interesting to understand what he was doing,” Belichick said.  “Certainly I’ve learned a lot from talking to Chip about his experiences with it and how he does it and his procedure and all that.”

Perhaps the ideal quarterback to run Kelly’s version of the spread option could be Michael Vick, the Eagles starting quarterback until late in the season. The only problem is that Vick, while he is still a good runner, has been injury-prone and has committed a large amount of turnovers over the last two seasons.

It’s highly unlikely that the team will bring the 33-yea r-old Vick back simply because they would have to pay him $16 million. The former Virginia Tech’s age and history of injuries is definitely not an incentive for the team to shell out that kind of money.

Meanwhile, Nick Foles, who is your requisite NFL-style drop back quarterback, said he has never played in a read option-spread offense and would prefer to play in a more conventional style. Can Kelly adjust his coaching style to suit what Foles can do as a quarterback?  We’ll see.

“I catch myself watching him in awe sometimes. Nick is a hell of a football player. That kid’s a warrior. He’s as good as anyone in the country,” Kelly told a Tucson, Ariz. newspaper after his Ducks beat Arizona in 2011.

One quarterback from the collegiate ranks that could possibly fit Kelly’s system is West Virginia’s Geno Smith, who played in a spread-option offense. He has a strong arm and completed 71 percent of his passes while throwing for 4,205 yards and a career-high 42 touchdown passes during his senior year.

Another thing to consider here is will Kelly be smart enough to surround himself with a coaching staff that’s familiar with the NFL, especially on the defensive side of the ball? For the last two seasons, the Eagles defense has been from mediocre at best to downright awful, especially in the secondary.

Eagles players, via Twitter and the team’s website, are saying they are excited to have Kelly as the new head mentor.

“He’s a brilliant mind. We have a lot of weapons on the Eagles that kind of assimilates to what he was doing at Oregon,” Eagles center Jason Kelce.

If anything, Eagles fans are hoping Kelly can be as successful as a Jimmy Johnson who went from winning national championships at the collegiate level to winning Super Bowls as a pro coach.

The biggest fear is that he could flame out like collegiate coaches Steve Spurrier, Bobby Petrino and Nick Saban, who had their shot in the NFL, but came up miserably short.

 

ESPN.com and the Associated Press contributed to this story.

Eagles 2012 Season: What Went Wrong?

Alex Henery's 26-yard field goal was the game-winning field goal in the Eagles 19-17 victory on Sept. 30. It was the last victory before the Birds season spiraled into an eight-game losing streak. Photo by Webster Riddick.

Alex Henery’s 26-yard field goal was the game-winning field goal in the Eagles 19-17 victory on Sept. 30. It was the last victory before the Birds season spiraled into an eight-game losing streak. Photo by Webster Riddick.

By Chris Murray

For the Chris Murray Report

PHILADELPHIA–The last time the Eagles played the New York Giants back on Sept. 30, the Birds came away with a 19-17 victory to give them a 3-1 record and had fans excited about a possible run for the postseason.

Even Giants players thought the Eagles were going to win the NFC East.

“At that point in time, I thought they were definitely going to be the team to beat,” said Giants wide receiver Victor Cruz. “They had everything going and they were on a nice winning streak. They were doing some good things. I was definitely thinking, in my mind, that they were going to be the team to beat.”

Unfortunately, that turned out to be the last game the Eagles would win before an eight-game losing streak destroyed the Birds season and perhaps signaled the end of the Andy Reid era in the City of Brotherly Love.

“We finished the game,” Reid said about the Eagles win over Giants in September. “We finished it with a win and we’ve had a couple since then that we haven’t quite finished in the fourth quarter or the other team started fast and we’ve been playing a catch up game. We just didn’t take care of business in the end there.”

This Sunday’s matchup with their bitter archrivals from North Jersey will close a bad season for the Eagles and possibly put an end to the Giants slim playoff hopes. When you’re coming into the game with a 4-11 record and facing an off-season filled with questions, spoiling your division rival’s postseason chances is the only joy you can get.

Everyone from fans to media folk is trying to figure out how a season with that kind of promise could deteriorate into the nightmare of a year that will end with double-digit losses.

Was it a couple games here or there? How much did injuries to the offensive line hurt the offense? Was it a defense that got torched badly in that eight-game losing streak?  Was it the firing of former defensive coordinator Juan Castillo?

“We’ve had chance after chance to win games and we shot ourselves in the foot whether it be turnovers, big plays on defense, special teams—not making plays consistently,” said Eagles safety Kurt Coleman. “It hasn’t been all-round great year for us as a team.”

You could get a variety of different answers and they would probably all be right in some way.

Perhaps it was the first two games during that losing streak—losses to the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Detroit Lions—that sent the Eagles spiraling into the abyss.

When you look back at the 16-14 loss to the Steelers, the Eagles had several chances to win that game only to have something go wrong.  On their second drive of that game, the Eagles drove to the Steelers three-yard line, but quarterback Michael Vick fumbled the ball at the one.

But the Eagles eventually rallied to take a 14-13 lead with a little over six minutes left.  But the Steelers went on a 14-play, 64-yard drive to Shaun Suisman’s game-winning field goal. The key play on that drive was a conversion on third and 12 by the Steelers.

“To me, that was a game we should have won and we didn’t get it done,” Coleman said. “We had them third and 12 and had them backed up. It was inexcusable for them to get that first down, they did and they ended up getting the field goal to beat us. That would have put us at 4-1.”

Perhaps the most painful loss of the Eagles losing  streak was when they blew a 10-point lead to the Lions in the last 5:18 of regulation and eventually lost in overtime. It was a winnable game that ultimately led to the firing of Castillo as defensive coordinator. The Eagles season took a nose-dive of biblical proportions as losses blowout to the Atlanta Falcons, New Orleans Saints, Dallas Cowboys and Washington Redskins put the Birds into a deep hole.
Cornerback Nnamdi Asomugha said it was the 31-6 loss to the Redskins (Nov.18)  where he figured that things had spiraled to the point of no return.

“The bleeding didn’t stop,” Asomugha said. “When we played Washington that’s when it hit up front when it was like what? Really?”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Done: After Loss to Carolina, Eagles Need to Look Ahead to Next Year

By Chris Murray

For the Chris Murray Report

Running back Bryce Brown was one of the few bright spots in the Eagles loss to the Panthers on Monday night. He gained 178 yards on 19 carries and two touchdowns. Photo by Webster Riddick.

If you’re still watching, you might as well look at the last five games of the Eagles 2012 campaign as an exhibition season where the team will be evaluating younger talent and older players will be playing for jobs either here or elsewhere.

With the Eagles seventh straight loss to the Carolina Panthers at Lincoln Financial Field, the playoff contending portion of the season is officially over. Actually, the Eagles hunt for the postseason may have been over last week in Washington or even the week before against the Dallas Cowboys.

We’re marking this as the “official” end to the year because Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie said earlier this year that an 8-8 record or worse was not acceptable and that Andy Reid would be fired if things didn’t improve. The way this season is going, the Birds will be lucky to finish at .500.  Suffice it to say, Reid’s days are numbered in Philly.

The 30-22 loss to the Panthers Monday night was a microcosm of the Eagles awful season. Defensively, the Birds were just plain clueless as Cam Newton picked apart the Eagles for 306 yards and four total touchdowns—two passing and two on the ground.  Since the firing of former defensive coordinator Juan Castillo, the defense has gotten progressively worse with each week under Todd Bowles stewardship as the defensive coordinator.

“It’s stressing because every possible way that we could lose a game, we’ve done it,” said defensive tackle Cullen Jenkins.

Carolina quarterback Cam Newton makes sure the ball crosses the plane of the end zone for a Panthers touchdown. The former Auburn star threw two touchdown passes and scored two rushing touchdowns in the Panthers win over the Eagles Monday Night. Photo by Webster Riddick.

On Newton’s first two touchdown passes, a 24-yarder to tight end Gary Barnidge and  a 43-yard strike to wide receiver Brandon LaFell, the defensive backfield was nowhere to be found.  During this seven-game losing streak there have been some bizarre breakdowns in coverage where receivers have waltzed into the end zone all alone and untouched.

“It’s miscommunication, missed assignments and that leads to what happened tonight, they just have a clear shot,” said strong safety Nate Allen. “It’s unfortunate, mistakes happen. But there’s no excuse.”

If it wasn’t for a couple of overthrown balls by Newton there might have been more touchdown passes against the Eagles defense.

When the Eagles bring in a new coach for next year, overhauling the defensive backfield has to be one of the priorities for the defense, especially at the safety position.  The players they have—Allen and free safety Kurt Coleman are somewhere between below average and just downright terrible.

On offense, there was a bright side and a downside with the negative trumping all the good things that happened. Running back Bryce Brown, who hadn’t played much football since his high school days in Wichita, Kan. had a huge game for the Birds, gaining 178 yards on 19 carries and two touchdowns—including a big 65-yard run for a score.

The downside for the Birds was Brown’s two fumbles killed drives and ultimately any chance the Eagles had for a victory.  You also had a sub-par performance by rookie quarterback  Nick Foles, who completed 16-of-21 for 119 yards and came close to being intercepted not once, but twice.

If you’re looking at a player the Eagles ought to keep for next season, Brown is a definite keeper. With him and LeSean McCoy in the backfield, the Eagles will have something special.

At the same time, it has to make Eagles fans wonder would have happened if this team had put a greater emphasis on the running game with McCoy and Brown.  Quarterback Michael Vick would have taken a few less shots to the head if Reid and Marty Mornhinweg would have utilized the running game more.

Even a patchwork, injury-riddle offensive line like the Birds can run-block when they are called on to do it. But during the Reid era, the running game, even when they have been good at moving the ball on the ground, is something they have been reluctant to utilize as the lead weapon in their offensive attack.

The next coach of the Eagles should understand that you need talent on both sides of the football. On offense, you need a balanced attack. You can’t throw the ball over 30-40 games and have the running game as an after that thought, something that happened quite frequently during Reid’s tenure in Philadelphia.

Defensively, you can’t just draw up a scheme and think you can win with a bunch of mediocre players. In his 14 years, Reid didn’t pay much attention to finding talent on defense.  By the time guys like former defensive end Jevon Kearse and their so-called shutdown corner Nnamdi Asomugha got here, their skills were in decline.

The only thing for the Eagles to do for the remainder of this season is evaluate the talent they already have and search the collegiate ranks for players to address the spots where they are weak.

Brace yourselves Eagles fans because it’s going to be a while before your Birds can call themselves a playoff contender again.

Eagles Need to Incorporate the Running Game to Protect Vick

LeSean McCoy Hopes to get more carries in Sunday’s game against the New York Giants. Photo by Webster Riddick.

http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/8428545/philadelphia-eagles-andy-reid-clarifies-qb-remark-michael-vick-not-worried

By Chris Murray

For the Chris Murray Report

While the rest of the world focused on the horrific call on what should have been an interception to end Monday’s Green Bay Packers-Seattle Seahawks game, there was something else that folks, Eagles fans specifically, should have focused on as well.

It would be the number of times All-Pro quarterback Aaron Rogers was sacked by the Seahawks defense. It was eight times. The pass-run ratio (39 passes, 21 runs) was enough to convince the Seahawks to pin their ears back and send folk flying at the quarterback. The Packers offense struggled to get the one touchdown they did get in the game.

If you’re an Eagles fan during the Andy Reid era in Philadelphia, Monday’s game was extremely familiar to you because you’ve been seeing it here in your own backyard for 14 years.

No matter how many times, folks want to blame Michael Vick for his lack of pre-snap reads, he holds the ball too long or he commits too many turnovers, we cannot deny is that when you pass all the time and the defense knows it, your quarterback is going to be in harm’s way whether it’s Vick, Tom Brady, Peyton Manning, or Rogers.

“That’s the key, you want to make an offense one dimensional so you can get after them,” said Eagles middle linebacker DeMeco Ryans. “If you know they’re going to throw the ball, you can definitely come after them and get more pressure on them. When you shut the run down completely, you put the ball in the quarterback’s hand and you can beat him.”

If that quarterback is working behind an offensive line that doesn’t have a lot of experience and you don’t want to give the ball to your best running back to slow the defense down, what you saw Monday night in Seattle and Sunday afternoon in Arizona is going to happen more often than naught. That’s not just on the quarterback, it’s on the coaching staff.

“Anytime you get the running game established in any offense, it keeps the defense guessing whether it’s a play-fake or a screen,” Running back LeSean McCoy said. “You have to keep those guys guessing.”

For all this nonsense that the NFL has become a passing league, you still have to run the ball enough to wear the defense down and give them something else to think about as they’re charging up field. The Packers with their 15-1 record in 2011, 30-plus points per game got knocked out in the divisional round of the playoffs last season.

You would think after 14 years and three games into the 2012 season that Reid would assess his current situation and do something to protect his injury-prone quarterback and his offense on the field in the game itself rather than doing so during his post-game or day after game press conferences.

When the Eagles beat the Baltimore Ravens, they put the ball in the hands of LeSean McCoy and Bryce Brown and ran more than they passed, there was a lot more rhythm in the offense because any defensive player will you tell a hard-charging running back and a 300-pound offensive lineman will slow down a defense and make them think—even if the team is 60-40 or 70-30 pass versus run.

“If a team is running the ball on you, it’s the start of a long day,” Ryans said. “You have to stop the run.”

What’s maddening about all this is that when Reid and the Eagles have effectively mixed in the running game, they’ve actually won more than they have lost. In 2008, after Donovan McNabb was benched in Baltimore, the Eagles utilized Brian Westbrook more than they had been in their offensive attack in the final six games of the regular season, they won five out of six   and almost went to the Super Bowl.

“Listen, you’re seeing it with some of the good throwing teams in this league,” Reid said. “Balance, you’ve got to have some sort of balance, whether that’s 60-40, 70-30. You’ve got to be able to obviously keep defenses off balance to get yourself in a rhythm on offense.”

Okay, coach, we’re going to hold you do that on Sunday night against the New York Giants.

Maryland puts Temple Away Late in Mistake-Filled Contest

By Chris Murray

For the Sunday Sun and CM Report

The Maryland Terrapins came into Saturday’s game against the Temple Owls as a 10-point underdog.

However, odds-makers don’t play football and by halftime, the game was a 23-point blowout in favor of Maryland as a listless Temple squad was being drowned by a stingy Terps defense and in a sea of its own penalties and turnovers.

But in the second half, the rejuvenated Owls rallied back to cut the lead to within two late in the fourth quarter. Unfortunately, it wasn’t enough as the Terrapins got a late touchdown to put an end to the Temple comeback and came away with a stunning 36-27 victory over the Owls Saturday afternoon at Lincoln Financial Field.

“It was a really a tale of two-halves,” said Maryland head coach Randy Edsall. “The first half we went out and capitalized on big plays and turnovers and then it reversed itself and they made some big plays. To have our guys come on the road against a quality, which Temple is, to fight through adversity to put that last drive together, it really showed me about the heart, the soul and character and belief that these kids have in one another.”

On the Temple side of the field, head coach Steve Addazzio  and his team will look at this game and ask themselves what the heck  happened, especially in the first half when Maryland jumped out to a 26-3 lead at halftime. Temple quarterback Chris Croyer said the team lacked intensity in the first half.

“We were playing very sloppy and we didn’t come out as fired up as we should have been. We came out very slow,” Croyer said.

The Owls simply couldn’t get out of the way of themselves in the first half and at times during the second half. For the game, they committed five turnovers, three in the first half.  They had a couple of bad center snaps over the head of quarterback Chris Croyer’s head led to a safety and slowed down another drive. There were some dropped  passes by Owls receivers and a blocked field goal.

“We didn’t get a rhythm going for a lot of reasons, most of which are three turnovers (in the first half),” Addazio said. “It’s hard you turn the ball over, you’re off the field. .. You don’t get a rhythm that way. Then you’re just calling plays, you’ve established nothing.”

Temple committed five penalties for 60 yards in the first half.

Maryland’s defense held the Temple running game to just 52 yards. Matt Brown gained just 31 yards on 10 carries after gaining 146 in last week’s win over Villanova.  Inexplicably, Temple passed the ball just three times in the first half. But found some rhythm in the second half, Croyer completed 7-of-18 passes for 178 yards and two touchdowns.

After the first quarter ended with the game tied  at 3-3,  Maryland seized control of the game in the second quarter and took a 10-3 lead on a 22-yard touchdown pass from freshman quarterback Perry Hills to senior tight end Matt Furstenburg.

Later in the second period,  Maryland upped the margin 17-3 on a 32-yard touchdown pass from Hills to Marcus Leak.  The four-play, 62-yard drive was helped by a 15-yard penalty personal foul penalty by Temple.

On the Owls next possession, Sean Boyle’s center snap in the shotgun sailed over Croyer’s head and the Owls quarterback recovered the ball in his own endzone for a safety.

Seven plays after getting the ball on a free kick, the Terps got an 11-yard touchdown run by Hills to give the Terrapins a seemingly insurmountable lead at the half. The last scoring drive of the half was aided by a roughing the passer penalty by the Owls.

“I don’t what it was on defense, a couple of dumb penalties, personal fouls and missed opportunities today,” said Temple linebacker Nate Smith.

In the second half, things seemed to be going Temple’s way when the Owls recovered a fumble on Maryland’s first play of the second half.  It took just four plays and 35 yards for Kenny Harper’s one yard run to cut the lead to 26-10.

But the Terps refused to fold and marched 67 yards in 12 plays for a 26-yard field goal that gave Maryland a 29-10 lead. The big play on that drive came on a third and 17 play from the Maryland 18 when Hills hit Marcus Leak for a pass that was good for a 39-yard gain.

On its next possession, Temple got a 62-yard touchdown pass from Croyer to C.J. Hammond to cut the lead 29-17.  When the Owls got the ball back they moved from their 40 to the Temple 23, but another bad snap by Boyle pushed the ball back to the 47. They managed to move back to field goal range and settle for a field goal.

The Owls had another opportunity for points after recovering a Maryland fumble at the Terps 12.  But Temple wound up with nothing after Maryland’s A.J  Francis blocked would what have been a chip shot field goal by Brian McManus.

Temple got the ball back one play late when Maryland’s Wes Brown fumbled at the Terps 49. Three plays later, Croyer hit Jalen Fitzpatrick for a 35-yard touchdown pass and that’s as close as Temple would come.

Maryland marched 75 yards in 11 plays to the seven-yard touchdown by running Justus Pickett that sealed the game for the Terrapins.

Temple Runs Over Cross Town Rival Villanova in Season-Opener

At just 5-foot-5, Matt Brown carried a big load for the Temple offense in their win 41-10 over Villanova. He gained 145 yards rushing and had 84 yards in punt returns.

By Chris Murray

For the Chris Murray Report

During his first press luncheon of the season on Tuesday, Temple head coach Steve Addazio said he wanted to pay close attention to how his young offensive line would engineer the Owls rushing attack.

The Owls first drive of the game may have given Addazio the answer he wanted to see.

Temple offensive line set the tone from outset by opening the scoring with a 14-play, 78-yard drive that culminated with Chris Coyer hitting running back Kenneth Harper on an eight-yard shuttle pass. Eleven of their 14 plays were on the ground.

“That was power football at its best,” Addazio said. “We wanted to do that and we did it and I was really excited about that.”

For the game, the Owls would roll up 301 yards rushing on its way to a 41-10 win over Villanova in front of 32,709 fans at Lincoln Financial Field in what will be the final Mayor’s Cup Game until further notice.

Whether it was running back Matt Brown or quarterback Chris Coyer or, the Owls offensive line was able to open holes for their backs. Brown gained 145 yards on 19 carries while Coyer added 86 yards on 13 carries. Addazio said he liked his line’s performance, but they have work to do to get better.

“I felt like they gave us effort, but we gotta get clean,” Addazio said. “We’ve got to finish blocks. I thought they protected well when we did throw it. I felt, at times, we looked good. We got a ways to go. This preseason camp I had to back off because we were thin and without a lot of depth. We were fighting through it, but we were a little gassed out there.”

With senior running back Montel Harris out with a hamstring strain early in the game, Brown was the big workhorse on offense. But in addition to his yards on offense, he had 84 yards in punt returns which gave him 229 total yards for the game.

“I think I ran okay, but I think I could have run even better, but you know everybody critiques themselves,” Brown said. “My O-line provided some holes for me and made it easier for me to run They created lanes that I could run through. We held it down.”

The Owls passing game, another area of concern for Addazio. Croyer was 5- of-11 passing for 61yards. But with the way the Owls ran the football on Villanova, they didn’t need the passing game as much. Croyer did throw a mean block on Villanova cornerback Eric Loper.

“”If we gotten a first down on the block I would have liked it even more,” Croyer said.

Meanwhile, the Temple defense also contributed to the scoring and set up the Owls offense with good field position to score. Free safety Vaughn Carraway gave Temple a 14-3 lead on a 57-yard interception return. The Owls sacked Villanova quarterbacks four times.

“The ball was in the air, I just went up and got it and saw the endzone,” Carraway said.

On Villanova’s next possession after the interception for a touchdown, Carraway recovered a fumbled at the Wildcats 24. Three plays later, Croyer scored on a 19-yard run to make the score 21-3.

“That was a big momentum changer,” Carraway said. “The defense needed that one so that we could get our offense back on the field to score some points.”

Near the end of the first half, Villanova’s offense finally got out of its own way and moved 69 yards in seven plays that was capped by a four-yard run by Villanova redshirt freshman quarterback John Roberston to cut the lead to 21-10.

But Temple effectively ended the competitive portion of the game on its next possession. It took them just 39 seconds to push the lead to back to 18 when Brown streaked past the left side of the Villanova defense for a 56-yard run.

“That broke out back and it hurt a lot when you have a team like ours that doesn’t have a lot of confidence and rhythm,” said Villanova head coach Andy Talley. “Now you’re down 18 and it’s like aw man, it’s a struggle.”

Temple got one more touchdown in the second half on a 38-yard run by fullback Kenny Harper and a pair of field goals by Brandon McManus, who became Temple’s all-time leader in field goals made with 48 surpassing the previous school record held by Bill Wright (1985-1988).