An Unlikely ALCS Matchup: Baltimore and Kansas City

10 Oct
The Orioles and Royals will have plenty of run-ins like this during the 2014 ALCS.

The Orioles and Royals will have plenty of run-ins like this during the 2014 ALCS.

By Barry Fedorovitch

For the Chris Murray Report

 

Exhaust all your metaphors about Freud, melatonin and the 13 movies that go by the same name. But make no bones about it.

The 2014 American League Championship Series is the Dreamers’ Series, an unlikely clash of two teams that have gone a combined 60 years since their last World Series appearances and yet have swept their way to within four victories of ending that drought.

The wild-card Kansas City Royals travel to Camden Yards to take on the A.L. East champion Baltimore Orioles Friday night to begin a best-of-seven series that is incredibly the first time the two have met in a postseason matchup. Note the long list of near-misses between the teams in the 1970’s and 80’s:

1973: O’s win A.L. East; Royals are second in A.L. West.
1975: Both teams finish second.
1976: Royals win A.L. West; O’s are second in A.L. East.
1977: A repeat of 1976 with the O’s finishing even closer (only 2.5 games behind the first-place Yankees).
1979: O’s win A.L. East; Royals finish second in A.L. West.
1980: Royals reclaim A.L. West title, but this time the O’s fall back, finishing second in the A.L. East (behind the Yankees) despite winning 100 games.
1982: Both teams finish second by narrow margins (the O’s by one game and Royals by three games, respectively).
1983: O’s win the A.L. East; Royals finish second in A.L. West.

That’s eight times in 11 seasons where both teams were either in or on the cusp of the postseason and yet somehow didn’t meet. In all eight cases, both teams entered the season considered a good team (with the most unlikely finish probably being the Royals’ second place in 1973 when the White Sox and A’s were considered co-favorites), ironic in that few pundits would have predicted this year’s clash.

Fueled by their league-leading 153 stolen bases (the same number they pilfered in 2013), the Royals won 89 games, three more than in 2013. Even more surprisingly was the emergence of the Orioles, who actually hit one fewer homer in 2014 (211), but improved by 11 games to run away with the East.

On the surface, that means a clash of opposites: the Royals’ speed versus the Orioles’ power.

The similarities between the teams? Underrated pitching and air-tight defense, the latter which could be a deciding factor in what figures to be a very tight series.
Just look at the respective outfields and you can understand why these teams are playing for the right to play in the World Series.

In Nick Markakis, the Orioles have the only regular right fielder in the American League who didn’t make an error this season. Markakis also led the league in putouts at the position and is flanked by Adam Jones, a Gold Glove centerfielder.
And yet has any recent outfield looked any more impressive in the field than the Royals did in the ALDS against the stunned Angels? In Nori Aoki, Lorenzo Cain and Alex Gordon, Kansas City offered a defense that would have made Seattle’s Legion of Boom proud, stealing would-be bloop hits by the bushel and denying extra-base hits at every turn to the point of completely dominating the team with baseball’s best record.

During the regular season, the Royals won four of seven, but it’s almost as if they didn’t meet at all since it’s been so long; their last matchup was May 18. Four of those seven games were decided by one or two runs, which could hint at the tense nature of the series that lies ahead.

It’s not the marquee big-market series television may have wanted, but it could be exciting and at the very least will be the end of a long drought for one city that dares to dream of a championship.

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