Student of the Game: Seattle’s Richard Sherman Says He’s the Best because of His Intellect

29 Jan

Today’s Report from Super Bowl 48 is fueled by the Philadelphia Black Public Relations Society

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Sherman says He Regrets Postgame Interview with Fox

By Chris Murray

For the Chris Murray Report and the Philadelphia Sunday Sun

Richard Sherman addresses reports during Super Bowl XLVIII Media Day at the Prudential Center in Newark, N.J. Photo by Chris Murray

Richard Sherman addresses reporters during Super Bowl XLVIII Media Day at the Prudential Center in Newark, N.J. Photo by Chris Murray

NEWARK,N.J.—Even if you thought Richard Sherman’s bombastic postgame interview with FOX’s Erin Andrews was unsportsmanlike, loud and the obnoxious immaturity of a 20-something athlete, he did give you something think about.

When he proclaimed himself the best cornerback in the NFL, you have to ask yourself is he lying?

In his three years with the Seahawks, Sherman has certainly put in the work to make that claim. The former Stanford star has 20-career interceptions including a league-leading eight in 2013. Sherman is a two-time All-Pro including the 2013 season.

Since his rookie season in 2011, Sherman’s interceptions are more than Tampa Bay’s Darelle Revis and Cleveland’s Joe Haden—the other two cornerbacks who also believe that they are the best in the game.

“We know that Richard Sherman is the best cornerback in the league and we believe in that,” said Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson during Tuesday’s Super Bowl XLVIII Media Day at the Prudential Center. “In terms of what he does on a regular basis, he puts in the work. … He’s one of the best. He backs it up by his play, his actions and everything he does.”

The six-foot-three, 195-pound Sherman is more than a guy with tremendous athleticism with a penchant for talking trash. With all his physical ability to keep wide receivers from making big plays, Sherman is also a solid student of the game, a trait not often associated with African-American athletes.

“A lot of people do have that misconception that athletes don’t think the game through and that it doesn’t take a ton of intelligence to play this game because it’s such a brute sport because of guys running into each other,” said Sherman, who had a 3.99 grade-point average in the class room at Stanford. “It takes a lot of intelligence and quick thinking. You have to think on your toes, study the concepts and you have to be able to translate what you learn in the classroom onto the field and that takes a tremendous amount of talent.”

Perhaps the biggest edge that Sherman has as a cornerback was that he played in 37 games as a wide receiver and accumulated 81 receptions for 1,340 yards during his days at Stanford. He said his understanding of the receiver position has enabled him to play the cornerback position well.

“That’s given me a tremendous amount of insight just being able to understand route concepts, understand formations, tendencies and things that they like to do,” Sherman said. “It’s situational football. When receivers split outside the numbers, what they’re trying to do inside the numbers. It really helps, especially in the West Coast offense.”

Sherman also credits his coaches at Stanford-Vic Fangio, now the defensive coordinator with the 49ers and Derek Mason, former Stanford defensive coordinator and new Vanderbilt head coach for helping him to understand the Xs and Os of the game.

Denver wide receiver DeMaryius Thomas said he considers Sherman to be among the league’s best corners and is looking forward to going up against him.

“He’s a great player, I’ve watched him on the field and he’s smart,” said Thomas, who caught 92 passes for 1,340 yards and 14 touchdowns during the regular season. “He knows a lot that’s going on. I’m looking forward to a good game.”   

During the course of Super Bowl Media day interviews, Sherman was inevitably asked about the postgame interview and the things he said about San Francisco 49ers wide receiver Michael Crabtree, he admitted that it was something he wished he could take back.

 “Last week I felt like I was just attacking a man—attacking it and taking away from teammates,” Sherman said. “You never want to talk down to a man to build yourself up and things like that. So I regretted that and I regretted taking away from teammates. That’s the one thing that I wish I could do again.”

Sherman said the viscerally racist reaction to his post-NFC Championship on the social media site Twitter may have been a blessing in disguise in terms of generating a dialogue on race.

“I feel that anytime you can restart that conversation and you get people past that,” he said. “You get people on the other side of that conversation to be accepting and have no color lines.

“Understand that everybody ought to be judged for who they are as a person and what they do for the community instead of just how they look and their appearance, regardless men, women, child, whatever their religious beliefs are. People should be judged by their character and who they are and not by anything else.”

 

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One Response to “Student of the Game: Seattle’s Richard Sherman Says He’s the Best because of His Intellect”

  1. Q_Crush January 29, 2014 at 1:35 pm #

    Great article and I’m glad you were able to get there to cover everything.

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